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programs. a lot of these visa programs, especially when the economy's doing really well and there's a lot of jobs available in the country, they fill up pretty quickly. visas for high-skill immigrants , the tech really wants that, wants more of those. you also have the h-2-b visas for foreign workers kind of for nonagricultural seasonal businesses. and you also have the h-2-a visa program which is mostly for agricultural workers. all these visa programs either have an arbitrary cap or are not being used that widely. basically that what businesses is want is they want to adjust these programs to the market so they can kind of rise and fall with demand. >> we thank you for your time today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> if you go to most american hivetry textbooks i would also make you a bet, if you go back to the textbooks you had in high high school, you can take me up on my bet, but my bet with you is that in your american history textbooks in high school, if you go to the index, you will find no mention
from how people personally did but how does it into the economy? guest: we are seeing an economy that is recovering slowly from the crisis and recession of 2008 and 2009. we can put a number of side for a minute because that is about investment income. even over the long time horizon, we are seeing incomes rise. people are earning more money. people are starting to put people back to work. certainly, this is not a happy days are here again and everything is fine. we are not healed but it is making progress in that direction. host: take a look at a lot of factors. it look at wages and income and rental income. you look at investment income as a whole. that paints a picture of where americans are financially. guest: that's right. you can't buy the things you need if you don't have income. for some, that is a paycheck from their job or from retirees, social security benefits. or for people who have invested a lot, it might be invested -- investment income dividends. wherever it comes from, that is the core of how you buy the things you need and want. host: our guests will take a loo
to bring down the debt. not just as a share of economy, but overall. you're right. it doesn't bring down the debt. at all. mr. speaker, that's the conflict that we face here as a people, as a country, not as republicans, not as democrats, but as a people. on the one hand, what our politicians are saying is we're going to use the money to pay down our debt. but what the reality is is that proposers are coming out today that never, ever, ever pay down a penny of debt. now, mr. speaker, if you want to see that for yourself, you can look. the president's budget each year is posted online, on the o.m.b. website. the first one he submitted, i hold the cover page here, was called a new era of responsibility. it was the first budget that the president ever submitted. but as i go through that budget, mr. speaker, what i see is projects -- proximates for 2020, for 20 -- projections for 2020, for 2030, for 2040, for 260 and for 2080 -- 20 of 6 -- 2060 and for 2080. you hear that, you have children. 2020, 2030, 2040, 2060 and 2080. and in each one of those years, according to the president's budget,
, is unconscionable. when we turn this economy around, and it will rebound, we need to end hunger now. we may not be able to wipe out all disease, we probably can't eliminate war, but we have the resources, we know what it takes. we need to muster the will to end hunger once and for all. hunger is a political condition. it's important to point out that even though 50 million people were food insecure, the vast majority had a safety net that prevented them from actually starving. that safety ned is called the supplement -- that safety net is called snap. snap is a program that provides low-income families with food they otherwise could not afford to buy. more than 75 million families relied on snap to provide food for their families. it is a lifeline for these 47 million people who struggle to make ends meet. i don't deny this is a big number, but it's a big number because it's a big problem. mr. speaker, america's hunger problem will be dramatically worse without snap. just imagine what this country would look like if we didn't have the safety net that snap provides for low-income families in
be a different story. >> i would remind you that three of mind -- six of mine, three of them were the economy. and that really stunned everybody. >> and even getting into this, this is the experience of the league of women voters, they sponsored the debate in 1976 and 1984 and for the sake of transparency i was one of the reporters that ask questions in 1984. when we finished with that, they pulled out of the sponsorship and argued at the time that there was too much party interference and they said that they had no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the american public. i think that this is terribly tough language, but my question -- this is overstated. >> but my question to you is not as moderators but as reporters. is this something where there may be the beginning of too cozy a relationship between the parties, and the public? >> i really don't -- i did a foreign policy debate and two of my sections were the middle east. are you going to talk about foreign policy without talking about the middle east? this? >> if they don't want to do this, this is fine with me. >> o
to the economy that we are not going to like. the headline from last week about the slowing of our gdp, it is going to be a situation where it is no longer acceptable to kick the can. so, when we talk about the need for tax reforms, i am one who says that we have got to put it all on the table. we have got to be willing to make some very difficult choices. the options if we fail to act are not something that most in this country will be satisfied with. >> i know that says you want to take a look at some of the energy initiatives here. in the house they talked about doing energy efficiency legislation puc that moving? still questionable? >> let me just start by saying that i am a firm believer in doing more in this country when it comes to efficiency. it is one of the legs of the energy tool that is absolutely critical to us. i think it is often overlooked. people look -- people look to the old technologies and there are things making news. someone joked to me once that if we could just figure out how to have a groundbreaking or ribbon cutting that involved some kind of energy efficienc
a living. often they do that in the shadow economy, a place where employers may offer them less than the minimum wage or make them work overtime without extra pay. when that happens, it's not as bad for them, it's bad for the entire economy, because all the businesses that are trying to do the right thing that are hiring people legally, paying a decent wage, following the rules, they are the ones to suffer. they have got to compete against companies that are breaking the rules. the wages and working conditions of american workers are threatened as well. if we are truly committed to strengthening our middle-class and providing more ladders of opportunity to those who are willing to work hard to make it into the middle class, we've got to fix the system. we have to make sure that every business and every worker in america is pulling by the same set of rules. we have to bring in the shadow economy into the light so that everybody is held accountable. the businesses and the immigrants getting on the right side of the law. common sense. that's why we need comprehensive immigration reform.
living in a county that is almost 10,500 miles of land mass. wyoming's economy is based on energy production, coal, natural gas, oil, uranium, and wind. the people working in the energy industry make a sufficient salary, but in some cases, it can skew the average income for families based on statewide data. some families do well financially. there are still a number of people struggling to make ends meet. this can be another challenge to meeting designating guidelines. thank you for your time and attention to this important matter. >> thank you for being with us. thank you for your testimony. i went forth witnesse is dr. andrew wilper. he is a practicing general internist. he is the associate program director at the boise internal director program. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. it is a great honor to testify here today. i was asked by senator sanders about my insight. one about the lack of health insurance in the united states and it affects on health and healthcare outcomes and to share my thinking on solutions to to the primary care workforce shortage. there is an e
living in a county that is almost 10,500 miles of land mass. wyoming's economy is based primarily on energy production -- coal, natural gas, uranium, and even wind, making it a boom and bust economy. many working in the agent -- in the area make significant salaries when they work, but this can skew the average income for families. although some do well financially, there are a number of people struggling to make ends meet. this income disparity can be a challenge to meeting designation guidelines. thank you for your time and attention to this very important matter. i look forward to any questions you may have. our fourth witness is the acting chief at the boise medical wrote center. dr. wilbert is the associate program director for the internal medicine program and the va center of excellence in primary care education. thanks very much for being with us. >> thank you, chairman sanders and members of the committee. it is a great honor to be able to testify here today. i was asked by senator sanders about my insight. specifically, and insight about the lack of health insurance in t
. >> there are times when parents are torn apart and children -- this system also restrains our economy. people who should be paying taxes are living in the shadows. we need to make them fully contributing members for our society. our economy is denied the contribution of people who want to work hard and be productive members of the society. this has lingered unresolved for far too long. it is time to get it done, move on, and fixing our broken immigration system, and no one disagrees with that, is urgent. i support the efforts of this bipartisan group of senators. people always looking for acts of bipartisanship in this body. take a look at this. this is work that is exemplary and i commend each of them. it is an urgent priority. our nation needs a common-sense solution in a tough and smart path to citizenship for the estimated 10 million citizens in our country who are undocumented. i have been advocating these principles for years. i am pleased the bipartisan framework meets that criteria. i am encouraged to see progress and they are finding common ground. president obama has made immigration re
. our economy.this this was suppose to be the day the president submitted his budget to the congress. it not coming.ming it's going to be late. some reports say that it couldth be as long as a month late. i guess that's too bad. our economy could use some presidential leadership right now. on thursday the presidentsban disbanded his jobs council after a grand total of four meetingsyr in two years. as americans got to work on friday, they learned their economy still isn't creating enough jobs. the unemployment rate actually went up. now government spending does cause growth, as the president believes, we shouldn't be having these problems. then may be, it wouldn't be so disappointing that his budget is late. well, we are having trouble and a large part spending is the problem. it's what's chasing jobs overseas and causing muchture anxiety about our future. one example of something the president's budget could have addressed is his sequester. sequester as washington speak is automatic spending cuts. the president first proposed this sequester in 2011 and insisted that it be part of the
talk about that, tom, a little bit? >> this is going to be in on economy of force response, the first of all, you know, other than actual physical defense, the cotton on the united states or legal united states has been our principal security interest since before we were a nation. it's clearly a moment in time and of course through history, gone back and forth between regimes in that area. and we have a lot of partners with whom we could be working. our model partnership with columbia, which has been a pretty low-level thing, but one which the house of representatives has traditionally kept very close tabs on his same model counterinsurgency partnership. if we had that model in some other middle east engagement, we would've been much better off also today. but it suggests again it's possible to work with the brazilians, for example. princelings were the leading force in the u.n. issued in haiti. so some good things have been happening, even why the cartel breaches have been hot and very serious threat to the civilians in mexico, so absolutely. likewise it's going to take a traditiona
of the economy, trade growth, population growth, the rise of china, but not just china -- that entire asia-pacific region -- we need to stay relevant to opportunities as well as challenges in all areas, particularly those we see emerging as to the largest, most significant economic security issues and opportunities. it is important that any nation rebalance assets. you have to be relevant to the times, the shifts, the changes. the world is different than it was 12 years ago. our force structure is being refit. we are looking at a far more agile, flexible force structure as our economies become more agile and flexible. for all of those reasons and more, that is why we are doing what i think is exactly the right thing to do, but it does not mean we are abandoning anyone, or any part of the world. we can not. >> senator, as we live in times of budget constraints, will you commit to keeping this committee informed as you develop strategies and contemplate posture adjustments that go along with this kind of rebalancing? >> yes, and i look forward to it. >> i am always heartened by the factor th
. >> here is to obama focusing on gun control rather than the economy. get back to jobs t real problem. caller: i'm also a veteran and i live in south georgia and there are armed guard in our local schools and they don't have any problem like that. i just want to make a statement of that and the fact that one of the things they mention about the gun shows. the reason some of these individuals go to the gun shows is it's kind of like a flea market or a yard sale. if they want to have a background check by these individuals that are bringing their guns to trade or sale, then the gun show representatives should have a central point where people could go to and be able to do a background check and maybe whoever is bringing a gun to sell, maybe they'll do a background check on that individual. and that individual could have an i.d. or arm band or wristband or something like that. then they could go to the central booth and be able to run a background check that happens to see them with their guns or at their table or whatever. >> it sound like you've been to a couple of these firearm show?
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14